It’s like a 100-foot-wide jigsaw puzzle.

Anybody who views this grand work of Spanish street art, called 100 Persianas, deserves a prize of new sneakers. That’s because doing so requires trekking miles to piece together its various bits, as if trying to solve a jigsaw puzzle that was thrown into a wind tunnel.

The colossal (and illegal) mural—measuring roughly 100 by 65 feet—is divided among 100 different storefront shutters in Barcelona. It was painted by self-described “vandalist” MVIN, who wore an official-looking yellow vest to cloak his actions from the authorities. The reassembled piece appears to spell the artist’s name—which is a little narcissistic, but admittedly deserved given the effort he poured into finishing it.

One snap from MVIN’s Instagram shows only 99 shutters, but we’ll take his word there’s another one lurking somewhere. Take a look:

 

A photo posted by MVIN (@mistermain) on

 

A photo posted by MVIN (@mistermain) on

 

A photo posted by MVIN (@mistermain) on

 

A photo posted by MVIN (@mistermain) on

 

A photo posted by MVIN (@mistermain) on

H/t Vandalog

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