Perfect for people who want to wash off days of grime in 0.1 seconds.

Olafur Eliasson/Anders Sune Berg/Neugerriemschneider, Berlin/Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York

Fans of dreamlike public art—or grimy people who want to experience the most punishing shower ever—should book it to Versailles, where there’s now a huge waterfall seemingly gushing from a rupture in space-time.

The massive, elevated faucet is a centerpiece of a new exhibit in and around the palace by Olafur Eliasson, whose artworks often play with natural elements like water and light. (You might recall similar waterfalls he erected in 2008 around New York, or the blocks of melting Greenland ice displayed at the 2015 Paris climate conference.) The artist writes:

For my exhibition this summer, I am doing a series of subtle spatial interventions inside the palace deploying mirrors and light, and in the gardens, I use fog and water to amplify the feelings of impermanence and transformation. The artworks liquefy the formal design of the gardens while reviving one of landscape architect André Le Nôtre’s original, unrealised visions: the placement of a waterfall along the axis of the Grand Canal. This waterfall reinvigorates the engineering ingenuity of the past. It is as constructed as the court was, and I’ve left the construction open for all to see—a seemingly foreign element that expands the scope of human imagination.

To achieve the floating ‘fall effect, Eliasson used a crane, hose, and a pump system. Here are some more views captured by photographer Anders Sune Berg, including a couple of that aforementioned “fog assembly.”

Olafur Eliasson/Anders Sune Berg/Neugerriemschneider, Berlin/Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York

H/t Dezeen 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a wallet full of Yen bills.
    Life

    Japan’s Lost-and-Found System Is Insanely Good

    If you misplace your phone or wallet in Tokyo, chances are very good that you’ll get it back. Here’s why.

  2. Design

    How We Map Epidemics

    Cartographers are mapping the coronavirus in more sophisticated ways than past epidemics. But visualizing outbreaks dates back to cholera and yellow fever.

  3. photo: Masdar City in Abu Dhabi
    Environment

    What Abu Dhabi’s City of the Future Looks Like Now

    At the UN’s World Urban Forum in Abu Dhabi, attendees toured Masdar City, the master-planned eco-complex designed to show off the UAE’s commitment to sustainability.

  4. photo: An elderly resident of a village in Japan's Gunma Prefecture.
    Life

    In Japan’s Vanishing Rural Towns, Newcomers Are Wanted

    Facing declining birthrates and rural depopulation, hundreds of “marginal villages” could vanish in a few decades. But some small towns are fighting back.

  5. An aisle in a grocery store
    Equity

    It's Not the Food Deserts: It's the Inequality

    A new study suggests that America’s great nutritional divide goes deeper than the problem of food access within cities.

×