“Kingspray” lets street artists flex their skills without the risk of getting chased by irate property owners.

Kingspray

Crafting fine graffiti can be rewarding, but there’s always the risk of being chased by security guards or having things spin wildly out of control after painting over somebody’s work.

For folks who want to spray under less stressful conditions—or who just want to practice new designs—there’s “Kingspray,” an upcoming simulator that should please fans of street art and quality virtual-reality worlds, too.

“Kingspray,” which has a release date of June 13 on Steam, is designed for the Vive, a VR headset somewhat akin to Oculus Rift. “Let your artistic skills free by spray painting on real-life surfaces without the fear of getting locked up!” write its creators. “The VIVE Motion Controllers allow for a precision and true-to-life feeling, all in awesome Room-Scale so you can move around your space to view your creation from all angles.”

Right now, there are three unromantic locations to virtually adorn—an urban roof, a train yard, and a back alley—but to judge from the videos of a “Kingspray” artist in action, they all look gritty-fantastic. Nifty features include the ability to add “drip” effects, making your pieces look all fresh and wet, and a music player that blasts your favorite streaming radio. Take a look:

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