The city plans to salute everybody’s favorite chomping-yellow orb with a new street mural.

Rejoice, people who cosplay as the planet’s favorite insatiable mouth-orb: Seattle is planning a ‘Pac-Man’-themed “pavement maze,” where you can pretend to hunt ghosts and inhale pellets to your heart’s content.

The city’s Department of Transportation, as part of its Pavement to Parks initiative, held a recent community vote about creating a new street mural; locals picked ‘Pac-Man’ as their preferred design. It’s slotted to go into this lifeless-looking pavement island in the Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Google Maps

A preliminary mock-up suggests the maze will have one Pac-Man and at least two ghosts, perhaps Pinky and Inky. (Or are they goblins? Nah.) Beating the maze, it seems, would require eating that power-pellet at lower right to decimate the enemies blocking your way.

SDOT

The transportation department says it’s planning to install the maze sometime “this year.”

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