At walls or people, your choice.

Want a new way to practice action painting, perhaps from a great distance on your enemies? The German aerial-photography group Cooper Copter has you covered with the “Pollockocopter,” a drone that hurls paint-filled balloons at the target of your choice.

There’s already at least one drone that illicitly tags walls with spray paint. The “Pollockocopter” takes it to the next level with bombs that, at the touch of a button, color targets with splash radii and long, dripping streams. Folks in Hamburg can see it in action next week when its creators deploy it for the Reeperbahn Festival.

Perhaps the biggest drawback of this remote-controlled painter is it can only carry a single payload. (Could the future bring a MIRV version?) That might be overshadowed by its customization possibilities, though—using it to put out very small fires, for instance, or tossing into your buddy’s hand a nice, cold can of beer.

H/t Urbanshit

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