Rickey Rogers/Reuters

A sampling of city-focused events around the world. This month: urban agriculture in Atlanta, the complexity of street networks, and how to love a city in the snow.

We’re tracking interesting and important events in urbanism happening around the world. Got an event we should know about? Send the details to nbalwit@citylab.com

February 2

STREET SMARTS: The Santa Fe Institute hosts a seminar on Scalable Methods for Acquiring, Analyzing, and Visualizing Urban Street Networks. Geoff Boeing of the University of California-Berkeley will discuss the ways “complexity manifests itself in the physical form of cities through various processes of self-organization and top-down planning.” He will present a new tool for data collection and the creation and analysis of street networks, along with preliminary research examining 27,000 street networks at various scales. 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m., the Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico

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February 3 & 4

MOVING INTO THE FUTURE: 92Y and Hundred Stories are hosting City of Tomorrow: Real Estate, Architecture, and Design Summit. The two-day event includes a wide selection of panels, intimate talks, and workshops on topics ranging from the downtown renaissance to feng shui to New York’s skyline in the year 2020. Tickets are available here. 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM February 3 and 9:30 AM to 3:45 PM February 4 at 1395 Lexington Ave, New York, New York 10128

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February 13

FOR MAPMAKERS AND TIME TRAVELERS: Carto (formerly CartoDB) is offering drinks, pizza, and a walk through mapping projects that show data over time at “No One Ever Said Mapping Time Was Easy” in their new Brooklyn office. CityLab’s own Laura Bliss will join several urbanists and cartographers to discuss the challenges of mapping through time, including “overlapping features, navigation through time and parallel boundaries/standards/data.” 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., 201 Moore Street, Brooklyn, New York

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February 16

A FLURRY OF ACTIVITY: Edmonton, Canada, hosts the second Winter Cities Shakeup, a gathering of “urban planners and designers, entrepreneurs and business people, artists, cultural and community organizers, and people who live in winter cities and want to take advantage of all winter has to offer.” February 16 to 18, Shaw Conference Centre, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

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February 19

GROWING OPPORTUNITIES: Atlanta’s Office of Sustainability is partnering with Blue Planet Consulting to host the inaugural AGLANTA conference on urban and controlled environment agriculture (CEA). Urban farmers, restaurateurs, grocers, architects, entrepreneurs and engineers will gather for a program of lectures, workshops, idea pitching sessions, and curated technology exhibits. Tickets are available here. The Georgia Freight Depot, 65 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, SW. Atlanta, Georgia 30303

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February 23

THE BIG APPLE: The CUNY Urban Food Policy Institute hosts a forum on food initiatives focused on residents of New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) developments. NYCHA houses 4.6 percent of New York City’s population and comprises 8.1 percent of the city’s rental apartment. Panelists on the forum on NYCHA Food Initiatives, including planners, researchers and health advocates, will look at how the NYCHA community is positioned for food innovation through public/private initiatives “encompassing urban agriculture, good food entrepreneurship, and increased quality and quantity of food retail outlets.” 4 to 5:30 p.m., CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, New York, New York, 10027

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