SNAP benefits add up to $1.86 per person, per meal. Here's what that looks like.

Editor’s note: Earlier this month, the White House surprised many observers by declaring a successful end to the War on Poverty. Now, the future of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is in the hands of Congress as it negotiates a farm bill. So CityLab visual storyteller Ariel Aberg-Riger is taking a closer look at food aid for low-income Americans.  

Further Reading:

  • ALICE (Asset Limited Income Constrained Employed), United Way
  • Declaring War on Poverty ‘Largely Over’ White House Urges Work Requirements for Aid, New York Times
  • Food Aid Doesn't Cover the Price of Food in Almost Every County in America, CityLab
  • Trump Signs Order To Require Recipients of Federal Aid Programs to Work, New York Times
  • Eligible Food Items, SNAP
  • More Than 40% of Americans Can’t Afford Basic Necessities, Metro
  • Americans are Mistaken About Who Gets Welfare, HuffingtonPost
  • How Do Americans View Poverty? Many blue-collar whites, key to Trump, criticize poor people as lazy and content to stay on welfare, L.A. Times
  • Farmer’s Market SNAP Crisis Gets Emergency Support, But No Long Term Fix, Grub Street
  • People on Food Stamps Buy These Items Most at the Grocery Story, Cheat Sheet
  • Snap Challenge Final Thoughts, Budget Bytes
  • Paul Ryan is Holding the Farm Bill Hostage Over Food Stamps, Mother Jones
  • NYC Community Health Profiles: Central Harlem, NYC Health
  • A Foodscape of Central Harlem, NYC Food Policy Center Hunter College

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    Is It Better to Be Poor in Bangladesh or in the Mississippi Delta?

    The Nobel laureate Angus Deaton discusses extreme poverty, opioid addiction, Trump voters, robots, and rent-seeking.

  2. a photo of yellow vest protesters in Paris, France.
    Equity

    To Understand American Political Anger, Look to ‘Peripheral France’

    French geographer Christophe Guilluy has a controversial diagnosis of working-class resentment in the age of Trump, Brexit, and the Yellow Vests.

  3. A rendering of a co-living building in San Jose.
    Life

    The Largest Co-Living Building in the World Is Coming to San Jose

    The startup Starcity plans to build an 800-unit, 18-story “dorm for adults” to help affordably house Silicon Valley’s booming workforce.

  4. a screenshot of a video about Baltimore's Metro
    Transportation

    It’s Time to Celebrate Baltimore’s Much-Maligned Metro

    In 1987, the Maryland Transit Administration busted out a brass band to open a subway that never had a chance.

  5. a photo of a striking Uber/Lyft driver
    Transportation

    Uber and Lyft Really Don’t Want California to Pass This Worker Rights Bill

    As California considers a gig-work bill to make ride-hailing drivers employees eligible for benefits and bargaining rights, Uber and Lyft ask for compromise.

×