SNAP benefits add up to $1.86 per person, per meal. Here's what that looks like.

Editor’s note: Earlier this month, the White House surprised many observers by declaring a successful end to the War on Poverty. Now, the future of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is in the hands of Congress as it negotiates a farm bill. So CityLab visual storyteller Ariel Aberg-Riger is taking a closer look at food aid for low-income Americans.  

Further Reading:

  • ALICE (Asset Limited Income Constrained Employed), United Way
  • Declaring War on Poverty ‘Largely Over’ White House Urges Work Requirements for Aid, New York Times
  • Food Aid Doesn't Cover the Price of Food in Almost Every County in America, CityLab
  • Trump Signs Order To Require Recipients of Federal Aid Programs to Work, New York Times
  • Eligible Food Items, SNAP
  • More Than 40% of Americans Can’t Afford Basic Necessities, Metro
  • Americans are Mistaken About Who Gets Welfare, HuffingtonPost
  • How Do Americans View Poverty? Many blue-collar whites, key to Trump, criticize poor people as lazy and content to stay on welfare, L.A. Times
  • Farmer’s Market SNAP Crisis Gets Emergency Support, But No Long Term Fix, Grub Street
  • People on Food Stamps Buy These Items Most at the Grocery Story, Cheat Sheet
  • Snap Challenge Final Thoughts, Budget Bytes
  • Paul Ryan is Holding the Farm Bill Hostage Over Food Stamps, Mother Jones
  • NYC Community Health Profiles: Central Harlem, NYC Health
  • A Foodscape of Central Harlem, NYC Food Policy Center Hunter College

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