If Tel Aviv’s history is a story of sanctuary and self-isolation, then its buildings designed in the Bauhaus style are monuments to just that.

Editor’s note: For CityLab’s Building Bauhaus special report, visual storyteller Ariel Aberg-Riger explains how Tel Aviv’s concentration of Bauhaus architecture came to be and what it represents today.

Further reading:

  • “White City of Tel Aviv,” UNESCO
  • “Bauhaus Fundaments” (PDF), RISD
  • “Form and Light: From Bauhaus to Tel Aviv” (Book), Yigal Gawze
  • “White City, Black City: Architecture and War in Tel Aviv and Jaffa” (Book), Sharon Rotbard
  • “Tel Aviv’s Architectural Brutalism: Ugly, Hated, but Glad to be Gray,” Haaretz
  • “Quick History: The Bauhaus and Its Influence,” Apartment Therapy

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