Pollinators—the wildlife that shuffle pollen between flowers—are being decimated. But they may still thrive with enough help from urban humans.

Editor’s note: For National Pollinator Week, visual storyteller Ariel Aberg-Riger looks at the birds and the bees in our cities and how they may still thrive with enough help from today’s urban humans.

[Native Plant Finder]

Further Reading:


Image credits: Rawpixel, James Ellsworth De Kay, Pierre-Joseph Redouté, Henri-Louis Duhamel du Monceau, Robert Havell, Sydenham Edwards, John Lindley

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