Reuters

Scenes of damage, after the derecho.

Cities up and down the East Coast are struggling to pull themselves together after a powerful series of thunderstorms left four people dead and millions without power.

As The Atlantic Wire reports:

A heat wave coupled with thunder showers and high winds wreaked havoc across eight states Friday evening, and in the aftermath millions have been left without power and four people are reported dead. 

CNN reports 4 million people have been left without power across all states affected by the storm, with 1 million people without power in Virginia alone. CNN's Jake Carpenter said the states without power include Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Kentucky, North Carolina, and parts of DC as of 5:10 a.m. Saturday morning.

People survey storm damage in the Capitol Hill neighborhood in Washington, June 30, 2012. Wind gusts clocked at speeds of up to 79 mph were reported in and around the U.S. capital, knocking out power to hundreds of thousands of homes in the Washington area. Photo by Jonathan Ernst/Reuters



People react upon seeing storm damage in the Capitol Hill neighborhood in Washington. Photo by Jonathan Ernst/Reuters



Photo by Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

 

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