Reuters

Pictures of the wildfire destruction.

Hundreds of homes have been destroyed by the wildfires that ripped across Colorado, the worst in the state's history. With the flames now mostly under control, residents are returning to what's left of their homes. As The Atlantic's Alan Taylor writes:

Residents of affected neighborhoods, who were briefly allowed to return and survey the damage, described "unreal" scenes where houses that burned down to their foundations stood side-by-side with homes that appeared completely untouched. While the Waldo Canyon fire is now 55 percent contained, it is only one of dozens of fires still blazing across the west.

Below, photos from Colorado. See more here.

One of the hundreds of totally destroyed homes in the Waldo Canyon fire, seen from the sky above Colorado Springs, on June 28, 2012.

Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters

A partially destroyed house still smolders in Colorado Springs, on June 28, 2012.

Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters

An aerial view of the Flying W Ranch, destroyed in the Waldo Canyon fire in Colorado Springs, on June 27, 2012. The Flying W Ranch was a working mountain cattle ranch and popular tourist attraction. The owners have committed to rebuilding. Photo by John Wark/Reuters
Dozens of homes in a Colorado Springs neighborhood, reduced to ashes in the aftermath of the Waldo Canyon fire, on June 28, 2012.

Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters


Policemen stand guard near residents who were temporarily allowed to visit their homes destroyed by the Waldo Canyon fire in the Mountain Shadows neighborhood of Colorado Springs, on July 1, 2012. Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters
 

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