Reuters

Pictures from the city as it weathered Hurricane Isaac.

Hurricane Isaac has moved on from New Orleans, leaving destruction and flooding. But relieved residents told reporters the damage was nothing like Hurricane Katrina in 2005. According to Reuters:

Multibillion-dollar defenses built to protect New Orleans itself, after it was ravaged by Katrina almost exactly seven years ago, passed their first major test, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. But massive rains and storm surge from the Gulf of Mexico inundated low-lying communities outside the federal flood containment system protecting the city, forcing the evacuation of thousands of people from their homes and dramatic rooftop rescue operations.

More than 730,000 residents of Louisiana and Mississippi are without power. There has only been one reported fatality from the storm. Below, scenes of city life:

Shelly Ackel of New Orleans carries an American flag through the French Quarter as Hurricane Isaac approaches . (Jonathan Bachman/Reuters)


People stand in line for supplies on Elysian Fields Ave. as Hurricane Isaac makes land fall in New Orleans. (Sean Gardner/Reuters)
A man and woman walk through flood waters on St. Roch ave. as Hurricane Isaac makes land fall in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Sean Gardner/Reuters)



A New Orleans resident and her child run for cover past an open French Quarter bar as Hurricane Isaac approaches New Orleans. (Jonathan Bachman/Reuters)



A general view of the New Orleans skyline is seen early morning in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Sean Gardner/Reuters)

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