How things looked early Monday, before the bulk of the storm made landfall on the U.S. East Coast.

Hurricane Sandy will soon bring heavy winds and floodwaters to the mid-Atlantic region. Here's how things looked early Monday, before the bulk of the storm made landfall on the U.S. East Coast:

A truck drives through water pushed over a road by Hurricane Sandy in Southampton, New York, on October 29. Hurricane Sandy, the monster storm bearing down on the East Coast, strengthened on Monday after hundreds of thousands moved to higher ground, public transport shut down and the stock market suffered its first weather-related closure in 27 years. (Lucas Jackson/Reuters)
A New York Police officer guards a closed subway entrance in downtown Manhattan as Hurricane Sandy made its approach in New York on October 29. Mass Transit ceased operation Sunday night due to the approaching storm. (Andrew Kelly/Reuters)
A public works employee attempts to keep storm drains clear of autumn leaves during Hurricane Sandy's approach in Washington on October 29. Hurricane Sandy began battering the U.S. East Coast on Monday with fierce winds and driving rain, as the monster storm shut down transportation, shuttered businesses and sent thousands scrambling for higher ground hours before the worst was due to strike. (Gary Cameron/Reuters)

 

Correction: An earlier version of this post contained one photo that was not actually from Hurricane Sandy, but rather an image of Times Square from August 2011. Thanks to our colleague Alexis Madrigal for pointing it out, and we regret any confusion.

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