Holm Architecture

A Danish architecture firm's plan to hover twin lunar orbs in the sky didn't get enough funding.

A sneaky art installation that would've made Brooklynites think they were going insane this weekend isn't getting built. As is often the case with the arts, it didn't get the funding.

Holm Architecture wanted to float an extra moon in the sky during Bring To Light, a nocturnal festival of art and music taking place this Saturday in industrial Greenpoint. The firm would've constructed the lunar intruder by taking a 24-by-18-foot plywood sheet painted to look like our favorite orbiting satellite, then cutting out skyscraper-shaped blocks in its lower half to match the Manhattan skyline, like so:

Holm would've then mounted it at the end of a Greenpoint waterfront street, so that partygoers looking west toward Manhattan would see what appeared to be another moon lurching into the sky. It's a nifty example of what illusionists call "forced perspective":

However, when I called Bring the Light's HQ this afternoon, a staffer said that there wasn't enough dough to pay for the superfluous moon. That means New Yorkers will have to recreate Holm's gag the old-fashioned way: drinking 'til they see double.

All images courtesy of Holm Architecture Office.

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