Holm Architecture

A Danish architecture firm's plan to hover twin lunar orbs in the sky didn't get enough funding.

A sneaky art installation that would've made Brooklynites think they were going insane this weekend isn't getting built. As is often the case with the arts, it didn't get the funding.

Holm Architecture wanted to float an extra moon in the sky during Bring To Light, a nocturnal festival of art and music taking place this Saturday in industrial Greenpoint. The firm would've constructed the lunar intruder by taking a 24-by-18-foot plywood sheet painted to look like our favorite orbiting satellite, then cutting out skyscraper-shaped blocks in its lower half to match the Manhattan skyline, like so:

Holm would've then mounted it at the end of a Greenpoint waterfront street, so that partygoers looking west toward Manhattan would see what appeared to be another moon lurching into the sky. It's a nifty example of what illusionists call "forced perspective":

However, when I called Bring the Light's HQ this afternoon, a staffer said that there wasn't enough dough to pay for the superfluous moon. That means New Yorkers will have to recreate Holm's gag the old-fashioned way: drinking 'til they see double.

All images courtesy of Holm Architecture Office.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  2. photo: a WeWork office
    Equity

    Amid Layoffs, WeWork’s Other Workers Are Making a Stand

    The co-working giant is letting 2,400 employees go and outsourcing 1,000 cleaning and facilities jobs as part of a company-wide belt-tightening.

  3. Transportation

    What Happens When a City Tries to End Traffic Deaths

    Several years into a ten-year “Vision Zero” target, some cities that took on a radical safety challenge are seeing traffic fatalities go up.

  4. photo: A Starship Technologies commercial delivery robot navigates a sidewalk.
    POV

    My Fight With a Sidewalk Robot

    A life-threatening encounter with AI technology convinced me that the needs of people with disabilities need to be engineered into our autonomous future.

  5. photo: A stylish new funeral parlor called Exit Here in London.
    Design

    Death Be Not Dull

    U.K. restaurateur Oliver Peyton’s newest project, a style-forward funeral home called Exit Here, aims to shake up a very traditional industry.

×