AP

Large parts of New York City are in the dark and under water.

It's shortly after 10 p.m. here on the East Coast, and at this point, we can safely say Hurricane Sandy is in no danger of failing to live up to the hype.

In cities large and small up and down the coast, it's downright scary out there right now. The most dramatic images so far are coming out of New York thanks to intense storm surge-related flooding and power outages. That said, D.C., Baltimore, and Philadelphia are still poised to take on record rainfall and are experiencing large-scale power outages of their own.

Here's what Sandy looked like on infrared satellite when she actually made landfall, courtesy NOAA:

And here's what she's already left behind in New York. Keep in mind, these conditions are likely to get worse before they get better.

Widespread power outages struck Manhattan shortly after 8 p.m.:

On Instagram, @andjelicaaa and @bmorrissey captured this ominous image of Jane's Carousel morphing into an island in Brooklyn Bridge Park:

Flood waters took over the Hoboken PATH station in dramatic fashion. Hoboken has been particularly hard hit by flood waters:

Major flooding on Manhattan's Lower East Side:

MTA Chair Joe Lhota and an inspector near the Battery as flood waters entered the subway system:

And this AP photo of the World Trade Center construction site flooding is going viral:

That top image is an AP photo of flooding at the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel.

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