High tides come back to the Italian city.

The Italian city of Venice, known for its picturesque canals, is also prone to flooding from high tides, a problem heightened by the city's gradual sinking. As the Associated Press reports today:

Flooding is common this time of year and Thursday's level that reached a peak of 55 inches (140 centimeters) was below the 63 inches (160 centimeters) recorded four years ago in the worst flooding in decades.

Below, a collection of Reuters photos from this year's flood season:

People sit on chairs in a flooded St. Mark's Square on Nov. 1. (Manuel Silvestri/Reuters)
A fruit stand at a local market is seen in a flooded street on Nov. 1. (Manuel Silvestri/Reuters)
Tourists walk on raised platforms for flood waters in St. Mark's Square on Oct. 27. (Manuel Silvestri/Reuters)

This isn't the first year that Venice residents and tourists have adapted to seasonal high tide. Below, some images from past years.

Tourists walk on 

a raised platform in St. Mark's Square on Nov. 26, 2010. (Manuel Silvestri/Reuters)

A gondolier pulls his craft gently through the arch of a Venice bridge on April 20, 2008. (Manuel Silvestri/Reuters)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: An elderly resident of a village in Japan's Gunma Prefecture.
    Life

    In Japan’s Vanishing Rural Towns, Newcomers Are Wanted

    Facing declining birthrates and rural depopulation, hundreds of “marginal villages” could vanish in a few decades. But some small towns are fighting back.

  2. photo: Helsinki's national library
    Design

    How Helsinki Built ‘Book Heaven’

    Finland’s most ambitious library has a lofty mission, says Helsinki’s Tommi Laitio: It’s a kind of monument to the Nordic model of civic engagement.

  3. Design

    Reviving the Utopian Urban Dreams of Tony Garnier

    While little known outside of France, architect and city planner Tony Garnier (1869-1948) is as closely associated with Lyon as Antoni Gaudí is with Barcelona.

  4. a bike rider and bus riders in Seattle.
    Perspective

    There’s No App for Getting People Out of Their Cars

    “Mobility as a Service” boosters say that technology can nudge drivers to adopt transit and micromobility. But big mode shifts will take more than a cool app.  

  5. Tourists walk along the High Line in Manhattan, New York City
    Life

    The Beauty Premium: How Urban Beauty Affects Cities’ Economic Growth

    A study finds that the more beautiful a city is, the more successful it is at attracting jobs and new residents, including highly educated and affluent ones.

×