High tides come back to the Italian city.

The Italian city of Venice, known for its picturesque canals, is also prone to flooding from high tides, a problem heightened by the city's gradual sinking. As the Associated Press reports today:

Flooding is common this time of year and Thursday's level that reached a peak of 55 inches (140 centimeters) was below the 63 inches (160 centimeters) recorded four years ago in the worst flooding in decades.

Below, a collection of Reuters photos from this year's flood season:

People sit on chairs in a flooded St. Mark's Square on Nov. 1. (Manuel Silvestri/Reuters)
A fruit stand at a local market is seen in a flooded street on Nov. 1. (Manuel Silvestri/Reuters)
Tourists walk on raised platforms for flood waters in St. Mark's Square on Oct. 27. (Manuel Silvestri/Reuters)

This isn't the first year that Venice residents and tourists have adapted to seasonal high tide. Below, some images from past years.

Tourists walk on 

a raised platform in St. Mark's Square on Nov. 26, 2010. (Manuel Silvestri/Reuters)

A gondolier pulls his craft gently through the arch of a Venice bridge on April 20, 2008. (Manuel Silvestri/Reuters)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Environment

    Let's All Swim in the Once-Filthy Canals of Paris

    Unlike many cities, the French capital has made good on its promise to re-open urban waterways to bathers. How did they do it?  

  2. Transportation

    5 Reasons to Be Wary of Elon Musk's Hyperloop

    High-speed vactrains might be the ticket for a Martian colony. As a practical transit investment for Earth, the technology has a long way to go.

  3. The Salk Institute, near San Diego
    Design

    This Is Your Brain on Architecture

    In her new book, Sarah Williams Goldhagen presents scientific evidence for why some buildings delight us and others—too many of them—disappoint.

  4. Cafe patrons sitting at outdoor tables beneath an awning
    Life

    In Berlin, This Coffee Shop Is a Microcosm of the Changing City

    The iconic Café Kranzler got a makeover. Now, the coffeehouse illustrates the schism in a city caught somewhere amid historic and hip.

  5. Life

    Say Goodbye to Spain's Glorious Three-Hour Lunch Break

    Catalonia plans to shorten work hours—but don’t call it the end of the siesta.