Almost three months later, there's still much to do.

It's been almost three months since Sandy struck the East Coast, causing billions of dollars in damage. Our colleague Alan Taylor over at The Atlantic's In Focus blog has pulled together photos that show how far New York and New Jersey still have to go. He writes:

While some of the estimated 230,000 cars damaged by Sandy's saltwater surge will soon be going up for auction, many are simply headed for the crusher.

See more photos here.

A resident picks up a trash can left on a sand covered street, two months after superstorm Sandy caused the damage in the region of Breezy Point in Queens, New York, on December 27, 2012.(Reuters/Lucas Jackson) 
 
Clouds roll over destroyed homes, two months after Superstorm Sandy caused damage in the region of Breezy Point of Queens, New York, on December 27, 2012. (Reuters/Lucas Jackson) 
 
A broken framed photo on the porch of a home devastated by fire and the effects of Hurricane Sandy in the Breezy Point section of Queens, on January 15, 2013. (Reuters/Shannon Stapleton) 
 
The remnants of two cars burned in a fire during Superstorm Sandy stand rusting in a parking lot in the Queens neighborhood of Breezy Point, on December 29, 2012. (Reuters/Lucas Jackson)

 
The remains of houses destroyed during Hurricane Sandy are seen in the Rockaways area of Queens, on January 14, 2013. (Reuters/Brendan McDermid)

A sign stands outside a home devastated by fire and the effects of Hurricane Sandy in the Breezy Point section of Queens, on January 15, 2013. (Reuters/Shannon Stapleton) 

 
A demolition crane clears debris caused by Hurricane Sandy, near the Ferris wheel at Fun Town Amusement Pier in Seaside Heights, New Jersey, on January 7, 2013. Most of the town's boardwalk was destroyed in late October 2012 by the superstorm. (Reuters/Tom Mihalek)

 

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