Reuters

No more complaining about a little snow.

In this Russian village, the name says it all. The Oymyakon Valley, known as the 'Pole of Cold', hit -90 degrees Fahrenheit in 1933. It's the lowest temperature recorded in the northern hemisphere. Yet, some people still call the valley home. According to Reuters:

The area is equipped with schools, a post office, a bank, and even an airport runway (albeit open only in the summer).

Below, pictures from the 'Pole of Cold.

A thermometer shows a temperature around -55 degrees celsius in the village of Tomtorin in the Oymyakon valley in northeast Russia. (Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)
A man passes a sign saying "Oymyakon 'Pole of Cold'" on the site of a former meteorological station in the village of Oymyakon, in the Republic of Sakha, northeast Russia. (Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)
Traffic lights are seen covered in snow in Yakutsk, in the Republic of Sakha, northeast Russia. (Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)
A car covered in ice is pictured near a playground in Yakutsk, in the Republic of Sakha, northeast Russia. (Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)
A man sells fish at the Farmers' Market in Yakutsk in the Oymyakon valley in northeast Russia. (Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)
A general view of the village of Tomtor in the Oymyakon valley, in the Republic of Sakha, northeast Russia,. (Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)

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