Reuters

The air is so bad, cyclists have taken to creating their own breathing contraptions just to get by.

Beijing's air is so bad, cyclists have taken to creating their own breathing contraptions just to get by.

At least, that's how artist Matt Hope is handling the current air quality crisis. Hope has invented a sort of "breathing bicycle," which he uses to travel around the city. The equipment used in construction is pretty basic -- an IKEA garbage can, fighter-pilot breathing mask, moped helmet, wheel-powered generator and home air filtration system. When he pedals, Hope activates a system to filter out haze and generate clean air.

Hope told Reuters he built the bike "as a way of protecting himself from air pollution." Below, photos from photographer Petar Kujundzic.




 

 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: A Lyft scooter on the streets of Oakland in July.
    Transportation

    4 Predictions for the Electric Scooter Industry

    Dockless e-scooters swept cities worldwide in 2018 and 2019. In 2020, expect the battery-powered micromobility revolution to take a new direction.

  2. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  3. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  4. photo: Dominque Walker, founder of Moms 4 Housing, n the kitchen of the vacant house in West Oakland that the group occupied to draw attention to fair housing issues.
    Equity

    A Group of Mothers, a Vacant Home, and a Win for Fair Housing

    The activist group Moms 4 Housing occupied a vacant home in Oakland to draw attention to the city’s affordability crisis. They ended up launching a movement.

  5. Environment

    Housing Discrimination Made Summers Even Hotter

    The practice of redlining in the 1930s helps explain why poorer U.S. neighborhoods experience more extreme heat.

×