Reuters

From Snowpocalypse to Snowquester.

The Washington Post Capital Weather Gang declared over the weekend that the late-winter snowstorm currently barreling across the country shall forever be known by history (and Twitter) by this politically of-the-moment moniker: The Snowquester! (The Post apparently learned nothing from the Weather Channel about the perils of unilaterally naming winter blizzards.)

One obvious problem with this epithet: No one outside of Washington wants to talk about the sequester (or uses it as a frame of reference for anything). Meanwhile, plenty of people outside of Washington live in the path of this storm, from the Midwest to the Mid-Atlantic to the Northeast. It is, however, a classic Washington move to forget that all these other people exist.

For this reason, "Snowquester" comes in for particular ridicule on our Imprecise Atlantic Cities Map of Obnoxious Snowstorm Names. We've compiled it looking as far back as the Noachian Deluge of 1862 (floodwaters in the lowlands, insane snowfall in the Sierra Nevada and Cascades). Most of these blizzards struck across multiple counties or even states. But we've pegged them on the map to specific locations based upon either 1) local media mentions, or 2) our own prerogative. Also, we have excluded all of the Weather Channel's recently invented nicknames on the grounds that you cannot name a snowstorm months before it ever appears on radar.

For the record, storm namers are at least getting more creative. The National Weather Service includes these pre-2000 un-hashtag-able handles on its list of the biggest snowstorms since 1888: "The Midwest Snow Storm of 1951," "The 1956 Southern Plains Snow Storm," and the "The Post-Christmas Storm of 1969."

Another popular name since 1888: "The Storm of the Century."

If we're missing any good ones below, let us know in the comments section and we'll add them to the map.

View Storm Names in a larger map

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