The storm that kind of wasn't.

The Snowquester — a.k.a. "Saturn" — is finally upon us. Weather forecasters expect 6 and 12 inches of snow to pummel the D.C. region today, for which the federal government has preemptively closed all of its Washington offices. (Which, incidentally, will grant White House Press Secretary Jay Carney a rare respite from the White House Press Corps — and canceled a Congressional hearing on global warming.)

While the storm has already begun hitting portions of Virginia, it hasn't really dumped much on D.C. (Yet.) As you'll see below, the effect is a bit disconcerting for those expecting a dramatic weather event.

Scenes from a (less than snowy) D.C.:

Further out, however, the snow appears to be piling up quickly:

But it looks like the snow is finally coming into D.C. One resident captured this scene at the Capitol:

Bigger:

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    The Price Black Voters Paid to Defeat Roy Moore

    Black voters endured waves of voter suppression to help elect Doug Jones to the U.S. Senate, and it didn’t have to be that way.

  2. Downtown Roanoke is pictured.
    Life

    The Small Appalachian City That’s Thriving

    Roanoke, Virginia, has become what many cities of its size, geography, and history want to be. It started by bringing housing to a deserted downtown.

  3. U.S. Embassy in London
    Design

    America's Passive-Aggressive New Embassy Arrives in London

    Why can’t we let bunkers be bunkers?

  4. Environment

    The Story of the Great Lakes in 8 Maps

    The book Third Coast Atlas seeks to illuminate the Great Lakes—America’s “third coast”—through maps, plans, photos, and more.

  5. Equity

    The Hidden Rooms Within New York's Public Housing

    A new study from New York’s Independent Budget Office reveals that nearly a third of public housing units are under-occupied, often by older residents living alone. But can the city find a humane fix?