The storm that kind of wasn't.

The Snowquester — a.k.a. "Saturn" — is finally upon us. Weather forecasters expect 6 and 12 inches of snow to pummel the D.C. region today, for which the federal government has preemptively closed all of its Washington offices. (Which, incidentally, will grant White House Press Secretary Jay Carney a rare respite from the White House Press Corps — and canceled a Congressional hearing on global warming.)

While the storm has already begun hitting portions of Virginia, it hasn't really dumped much on D.C. (Yet.) As you'll see below, the effect is a bit disconcerting for those expecting a dramatic weather event.

Scenes from a (less than snowy) D.C.:

Further out, however, the snow appears to be piling up quickly:

But it looks like the snow is finally coming into D.C. One resident captured this scene at the Capitol:


This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

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