Let's not forget about the victims of this week's other major explosion.

While most of our attention today is on the city of Boston, residents of the small city of West, Texas, just 20 miles north of Waco, are living a far different reality.

The large explosion at a fertilizer plant on Wednesday evening has killed at least 12 and injured more than 200, damaging many homes and businesses in a city of about 2,800 people. The New York Times reports today: "By daybreak on Friday, rescue personnel had combed through 150 buildings, though there were 25 more to go. Fifty homes were completely destroyed, as well as three fire trucks and one ambulance, [Sgt. Jason Reyes of the Texas Department of Public Safety] said." Texas Governor Rick Perry said, according to the article, that "because of West's small size, 'this tragedy has most likely hit every family.'"

Reuters photographers captured the town as it begins the process of recovery.

An aerial view shows the aftermath of the explosion. (Adrees Latif/Reuters)
Police and rescue workers stand near a building which was left destroyed from the explosion. (Adrees Latif/Reuters)
Brandon Smith removes broken glass from the West Thrift Shop after the explosion damaged the store. (Mike Stone/Reuters)
Ronald Tanner of Jonesboro, Texas carries supplies to be delivered to residents of West displaced by the explosion. (Mike Stone/Reuters)
Meghan Clontz of Oklahoma City travelled to West to be with family members after the explosion. (Tim Sharp/Reuters)
Residents take part in a candle light vigil at St. Mary's Catholic Church. (Jaime R. Carrero/Reuters)

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