Reuters

At least six people were killed.

Heavy thunderstorms thrashed the Argentinian capital this morning, causing widespread floods, damaged property, and power loss. Emergency personnel are traversing the city by boat to help those marooned.

Clean-up is also underway, though it's been slow-going in the hardest-hit neighborhoods. The City's SAME emergency service has said at least six people were killed, and the toll could continue to rise.

Residents look at a submerged car in a flooded street after a rainstorm. (Enrique Marcarian/Reuters)
A man is seen next to a boat in a flooded street after a rainstorm. (Enrique Marcarian/Reuters)
A man paddles through a flooded street after a rainstorm. (Enrique Marcarian/Reuters)
Residents look down from a balcony at a flooded street after a rainstorm in Buenos Aires. (Enrique Marcarian/Reuters)



Residents sit on a bench at a flooded public square after a rainstorm in Buenos Aires.

(Enrique Marcarian/Reuters)

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