Devastating photos of the massive floods, which have killed at least 8 people. Thousands more have been evacuated.

Massive floods forced thousands of people from their homes in Central Europe over the weekend.

According to the BBC, more than 7,000 people have evacuated Eilenburg, Germany; 3,000 more left their homes in central Czech Republic, including parts of Prague. Much of the Czech capital is inaccessible by foot and electricity has been shut down as a precaution. Underground subway stations have been closed and animals from the zoo have been relocated to higher ground.

Austria's meteorological service says the country has received 2 months of rain in 2 days. Water levels in the German city of Passau are at their highest level since 1501. 

The German army, according to an Al Jazeera report, has sent 1,760 soldiers to help local authorities and volunteers in the hardest hit parts of the country. In Prague, troops are putting up metal barriers and filling sandbags. And officials say there may be more damage to come. "The story is not yet over here," Environment Minister Tomas Chalupa told Al Jazeera.

Below, a look at the damage:

The statue of world harmony leader Sri Chinmoy is partially submerged in water from the rising Vltava river in Prague June 2, 2013. Rivers across the Czech Republic are rising fast due to heavy rain. REUTERS/David W Cerny

People sit in the upstairs windows of their flooded house in the centre of the Bavarian town of Passau, about 200 km (124 miles) north-east of Munich June 3, 2013. Torrential rain in the south and south-east of Germany caused heavy flooding over the weekend, forcing people to evacuate their homes. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

A resident stands at his property on a flooded street in the town of Grimma, near Leipzig June 2, 2013. Authorities in the German state of Saxon have declared Grimma a disaster area, according to local media. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

People walk through the flooded centre of the Bavarian town of Passau, about 200 km (125 miles) northeast of Munich June 3, 2013. Following heavy rain and thaw, the Inn and Donau rivers are expected to rise to over 11 meters. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

A police officer stands guard in front of a closed subway station in Prague June 2, 2013. Czech soldiers erected metal barriers and piled up sandbags on Sunday to protect Prague's historic center from flooding after days of heavy rains swelled rivers and forced evacuations from some low-laying areas. Prague authorities also limited public transport and closed underground stations as water from the Vltava River overflowed into parts of the Old Town. REUTERS/David W Cerny

Flooded houses next to river Steyr are pictured during heavy rainfall in the small Austrian city of Steyr June 2, 2013. During heavy rain rivers burst their banks, flooding parts of Tyrol, Salzburg, Lower and Upper Austria. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger

The flooded Vltava river is seen behind the statue of Czech legendary knight Bruncvik in Prague, June 2, 2013. City authorities limited public transport and closed underground stations as water from the Vltava River overflowed several parts of Prague. REUTERS/Petr Josek

The sign above the door of restaurant and hotel 'Am Paulusbogen' is partially submerged in the flooded centre of the Bavarian town of Passau, about 200 km (124 miles) north-east of Munich June 3, 2013. Torrential rain in the south and south-east of Germany caused heavy flooding over the weekend, forcing people to evacuate their homes. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

A policeman stands by the Husinec Dam in south Bohemia June 2, 2013. Czech soldiers erected metal barriers and piled up sandbags on Sunday to protect Prague's historic center from flooding after days of heavy rains swelled rivers and forced evacuations from some low-laying areas. REUTERS/Petr Josek

A street sign is partially submerged in the flooded centre of the Bavarian town of Passau, about 200 km (124 miles) north-east of Munich June 3, 2013. Torrential rain in the south and south-east of Germany caused heavy flooding over the weekend, forcing people to evacuate their homes. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Maps

    Your Maps of Life Under Lockdown

    Stressful commutes, unexpected routines, and emergent wildlife appear in your homemade maps of life during the coronavirus pandemic.

  2. photo: The Pan-Am Worldport at JFK International Airport, built in 1960,
    Design

    Why Airports Die

    Expensive to build, hard to adapt to other uses, and now facing massive pandemic-related challenges, airport terminals often live short, difficult lives.

  3. photo: Social-distancing stickers help elevator passengers at an IKEA store in Berlin.
    Transportation

    Elevators Changed Cities. Will Coronavirus Change Elevators?

    Fear of crowds in small spaces in the pandemic is spurring new norms and technological changes for the people-moving machines that make skyscrapers possible.

  4. photo: an open-plan office
    Life

    Even the Pandemic Can’t Kill the Open-Plan Office

    Even before coronavirus, many workers hated the open-plan office. Now that shared work spaces are a public health risk, employers are rethinking office design.

  5. Maps

    Visualizing the Hidden ‘Logic’ of Cities

    Some cities’ roads follow regimented grids. Others twist and turn. See it all on one chart.

×