What the West Coast would look like submerged under rising seas.

Which West Coast cities would still be habitable as sea levels rise? 

Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm recently released a new set of graphics showing what several West Coast cities would look like submerged under 5, 12, or 25 feet of water. While sea levels probably won’t rise a whole 25 feet in our lifetime, these bleak forecasts should leave you concerned for what’s causing the steadily climbing oceans.

As Lamm told Mashable, "By illustrating what sea level rise will look like in real life, I'm hoping to make our rising oceans a bigger issue on peoples' minds."

AT&T Park/Giants Stadium in San Francisco 
Crissy Field in San Francisco
Venice Beach
San Diego Convention Center  

To create these images, Lamm began with a stock photo of a location. Then he used location data from Apple Maps and Google Earth to find corresponding sea level rise information. He has used a similar process to submerge East Coast cities like New York and Miami back in April. 

All images: Nickolay Lamm/StorageFront

(h/t Next City)

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