@cnfocus/Twitter

A school administrator says the workout can detoxify lungs and dispel residue gas.

A school in one of the most smog-ridden Chinese cities has a new strategy: kung fu aerobics.

The two-minute workout includes 23 moves designed by Huanqiang Wei, deputy dean of Guangming Road Primary School in Shijiazhuang. Wei believes two of the moves -- pressing an acupuncture point and breathing into the belly -- are especially effective in defending the body against poor air quality.

"Pressing the Hegu acupoint, located between the thumb and index finger at the back of the hand, helps promote lungs' detoxification. Breathing into the belly dispels more residue gas left in human organs, reducing the harm caused by smog," he told Xinhua News.

While the doctor interviewed says pressing acupoints can boost the immune system, there’s no evidence kung fu aerobics will prevent smog-related disease. Unsurprisingly, the idea has received much ridicule from Chinese Internet users.   

This news story has footage of students doing the exercises -- it’s in English! 

 

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