Intense gridlock trapped some people inside cars for 7-plus hours.

UPDATE: The madness continues, with Weather Channel meteorologist Jim Cantore kneeing some dumb kid in the groin:

ORIGINAL: It snowed in Atlanta on Tuesday, and the mood quickly became frenzied. For instance, by 6 p.m. the local Hartsfield-Jackson airport had logged 2 inches of powder. Guess how many TV reporters that kind of weather warranted? Four? Six?

Wrong – it's 14, from a single station. Bask in the glory of this wall of news personalities from WSB-TV:

But the city's snow-related meltdown started way earlier in the day, on the highways. One perceptive Twitter user known as @a23kiki23 illustrated Atlanta's descent into automotive mayhem with this montage of traffic delays:

Here's a good look at what the traffic was like when the snow was coming down "hard." There's no indication that the roadway situation, a.k.a. the "unmitigated disaster," has changed since sundown:

Oh wait, there aren't enough trucks skidding out in that photo. Try this one:

Reports from the ground illuminate what a massive ball of chaos the city's roads are in. "There are hundreds of crashes all over town," WSB-TV wrote at 7:51 p.m. "Bridges and overpasses are frozen. Hills are hard to climb. There are cars in ditches all over. Most major surface streets are jammed, just as the interstates are." Adds 28 Storms: "Some people have been stuck on the road for 7+ hours while hundreds of elementary school students remain stuck in schools."

A pair of writers at Business Insider summed it up nicely by saying the "scene resembles the giant traffic jam depicted on 'The Walking Dead' after Atlanta is taken over by zombies." Be thankful for that, Atlanta – at least on this special day you don't have to deal with undead flesh-eaters.

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