REUTERS

A GIF to remember the endless snow of 2014. 

Years from now, residents of the Mid-Atlantic will remember 2014 as the year they wore snow boots for a month. Reporter Steve Keeley, of FOX 29 in Philadelphia, will remember it as the year he got plowed: 

Hat tip to Dan McQuade, and condolences to Keeley, who says he's fine.

The Fox reporter wasn't alone in getting unsuspectingly doused by a plow's wave this winter. In early February, New York City resident Pedro Plaza got knocked down while trudging a sidewalk in Brooklyn: 

The two New York plow drivers are being investigated, and Plaza says he might sue the city

Watch out for those plows, y'all! 

Top image: REUTERS/Gary Cameron

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