An interactive map shows the predicted high temperatures in 1,001 U.S. cities and towns.

A woman wilting in Las Vegas' July 1 heat of 105 degrees. (Associated Press)

Here's something sure to wilt the spirits of Phoenix residents: By the year 2100, the average summer high temperature may have bubbled up from 104 degrees to a scalp-broiling 114 degrees. That blast of heat is equivalent to the awful summer highs people today sweat through in Kuwait City.

The heat bomb primed to soon explode can now be explored in 1,001 U.S. cities, thanks to the below interactive map from the folks at Climate Central. They've used weather data to postulate average summer highs at the end of the century. They then compare your city's future heat to another place currently experiencing that level of misery. For instance, Boston's expected highs of 89 degrees is like being in contemporary North Miami Beach; the District of Columbia's 97 degrees is like Pharr, Texas; and Las Vegas' 111 degrees is Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (It seems as though much of the Southwest will one day resemble the Middle East, in fact.)

These temperatures are based on a scenario in which nothing is done to mitigate the reigning emission trends. Here's Climate Central giving a bit more insight into its predictions:

On average, summer heat is projected to warm 7-10°F, though some cities will have summers 12°F warmer than they are now. As you explore the interactive, you'll find that for cities in the Northwest, the Great Plains, the Midwest, and the Northeast, warming is best illustrated by a southward shift. In some cases, however, the shift is slightly northward and inland—for example, warming in coastal San Diego will make it feel like Lexington, Ky.,—and represents more than a 6°F temperature increase.

This analysis only accounts for daytime summer heat—the hottest temperatures of the day, on average between June-August—and doesn't incorporate humidity or dewpoint, both of which contribute to how uncomfortable summer heat can feel. This projected warming also assumes greenhouse gas emissions keep increasing through 2080, just as they have been for the past several decades.

Should you want to know more about the methodology underlining these predictions, root around in Climate Central's lengthier explanation. It includes the dismal side note that even if humans swiftly and drastically cut down on emissions, "U.S. cities are already locked into some amount of summer warming through the end of the century."

H/t Google Maps Mania

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Coronavirus

    Why Asian Countries Have Succeeded in Flattening the Curve

    To help flatten the curve in the Covid-19 outbreak, officials at all levels of government are asking people to stay home. Here's what’s worked, and what hasn't.

  2. Equity

    Why Not Just Stop Paying Rent?

    Because of coronavirus, millions of tenants won’t be able to write rent checks. But calls for a rent holiday often ignore the longer-term economic effects.

  3. photo: a For Rent sign in a window in San Francisco.
    Coronavirus

    Do Landlords Deserve a Coronavirus Bailout, Too?

    Some renters and homeowners are getting financial assistance during the economic disruption from the coronavirus pandemic. What about landlords?

  4. photo: An empty park in New Rochelle, a suburb of New York City hit by a spike in coronavirus cases.
    Coronavirus

    Are Suburbs Safer From Coronavirus? Probably Not.

    Urban density does play a role in disease transmission. But rural areas and suburban sprawl aren’t necessarily safer spaces to ride out the Covid-19 crisis.

  5. Equity

    The Last Daycares Standing

    In places where most child cares and schools have closed, in-home family daycares that remain open aren’t seeing the demand  — or the support — they expected.

×