Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee

Families have lived on Isle de Jean Charles for generations. Within two years, it will probably be underwater. 

 
Families have lived on Isle de Jean Charles for generations, fishing in its waters and setting their roots deep into its soil. In recent years, however, the threat of rising sea levels, powerful storms, and coastal erosion—along with the consequences of oil drilling and levee projects—have forced all but a few to leave. The island, one resident tells filmmaker Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, "is just a skeleton of what it used to be."

To learn more about the plight of Isle de Jean Charles, read these stories by the Times-Picayune, the New York Times, and Newshour.
 

Courtesy of Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A young girl winces from the sting as she receives the polio vaccine in 1954.
    Life

    How Mandatory Vaccination Fueled the Anti-Vaxxer Movement

    To better understand the controversy over New York’s measles outbreak, you have to go back to the late 19th century.

  2. A photo of a closed street in St. Louis
    Equity

    The Curious Tale of the St. Louis Street Barriers

    Thanks to an '80s mania for traffic calming, the St. Louis grid is broken by hundreds of bollards and cul-de-sacs. Critics say it’s time to get rid of them.

  3. People eat and drink coffee inside a small coffeehouse.
    Life

    Gentrification Is Hurting Kuala Lumpur's Iconic Coffee Shops

    Traditional kopitiams, which serve sweetened coffee in no-frills surroundings, are a part of Malaysian national identity, but their survival is precarious.

  4. Charts

    The Evolution of Urban Planning in 10 Diagrams

    A new exhibit from the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association showcases the simple visualizations of complex ideas that have changed how we live.

  5. A photo of the Notre-Dame Cathedral fire in Paris.
    Design

    Amid Notre-Dame’s Destruction, There’s Hope for Restoration

    Flames consumed the roof and spire of the 13th-century cathedral in Paris. The good news: Gothic architecture is built to handle this kind of disaster.