NYC climate-change protests continue today, with activists now occupying Wall Street to draw attention to its role in the crisis.

"Several thousand" protesters halted traffic around Wall Street in downtown Manhattan this afternoon, according to #FloodWallStreet, an activist group organizing the demonstration. The group is a "coalition of individuals concerned with climate injustices," says Jason Schneider, a spokesman for #FloodWallStreet. The protest follows yesterday's People's Climate March, which drew an estimated 310,000 people to New York City.

The group's official slogan is “Stop Capitalism. End the Climate Crisis,” and draws a direct line between climate change and the big-money interests represented by New York's financial center.

Drawing attention to companies involved in fracking appears to be a chief aim of the protesters, according to photographs shared on Twitter and other social media outlets. A large, inflated carbon "bubble" accompanied the marchers as they made their way from Battery Park to Wall Street, just a few blocks away.

"#FloodWallStreet will target corporate polluters and those profiting from the fossil fuel industry," according to the movement's website. "Participants will carry out a massive sit-in to disrupt business as usual."

Here are some images from the ongoing protest:

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