Skeptical Science

Real-life climate researchers have lent their likenesses to this skeptic-destroying comic series.

Because people who deny climate change can seem comical, here's a great project to deal with them on their level: hand-scrawled cartoons of real-life scientists, popping off word balloons loaded with climate facts.

The playful series is called "97 Hours of Consensus," a reference to the 97 percent of climate researchers who believe in anthropogenic global warming. Curated by Australia's John Cook at the always-engaging Skeptical Science—a ticker on the site alerts us that the climate has accumulated the heat equivalent of more than 2.1 billion Hiroshima bombs since 1998—the project is posting a new, slightly Futurama-looking caricature every hour this week. Look, here's Michael Mann of hockey-stick temperature-graph fame warning of possible grim times ahead:

Cook is not a climate scientist himself (he's a climate-communication fellow at the University of Queensland), but he and his team did take the time to source these quotes from email interviews, news articles, YouTube videos, and elsewhere. As to why he kicked off this labor of passion, he writes:

97 Hours of Consensus communicates the fact that 97% of climate scientists have concluded that humans are causing global warming....

In contrast, less than 10% of Americans are aware of the 97% consensus on climate change. This 'consensus gap' matters. When the public aren't aware of the overwhelming scientific agreement on global warming, they're less likely to support action to mitigate climate change. 97 Hours of Consensus seeks to close the consensus gap.

The cartoons are not copyrighted, so feel free to tweet them among friends with the #97Hours tag or pelt them at people who think the increasingly sweltering climate is due to sunspots. Here are a few of my favorites:

H/t Bad Astronomy

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