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It's less about surviving an outbreak of the walking dead and more about walking away alive from other disasters.

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback wants his state to be ready when zombies arrive.

And to make sure Kansas takes the threat of a zombie apocalypse seriously, Brownback plans to officially declare October "Zombie Preparedness Month" during a ceremonial event Friday at the Kansas Statehouse.

Zombie Preparedness Month, however, is not actually about planning a defense against viral reincarnate flesh eaters. Instead, Brownback's administration wants to capitalize on pop culture's zombie obsession to raise awareness about disaster planning and response.

State officials say the preparations needed for a fictional zombie attack are a good exercise for the natural disasters that could actually hit Kansas in the near future. The agency is calling on Kansans to devise a survival plan that they could implement in the unlikely event that a horde of zombies descends upon the Sunflower State. Five of the best entries will be highlighted during "Zombie Preparedness Day" on Oct. 25, an event that will take place in Topeka.

"If you're equipped to handle the zombie apocalypse, then you're prepared for tornadoes, severe storms, fire, and any other natural disaster Kansas usually faces," said Devan Tucking, a Human Services Officer with the Kansas Division of Emergency Management.

And Kansas isn't the only place preparing for the arrival of the living dead. In Virginia, Northern Virginia Community College is planning an event Thursday where zombie look-alikes will swarm the campus sharing tips with students about how to plan for disaster.

This post originally appeared on National Journal, an Atlantic partner site.

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