Prince Williams/Getty Images

It's less about surviving an outbreak of the walking dead and more about walking away alive from other disasters.

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback wants his state to be ready when zombies arrive.

And to make sure Kansas takes the threat of a zombie apocalypse seriously, Brownback plans to officially declare October "Zombie Preparedness Month" during a ceremonial event Friday at the Kansas Statehouse.

Zombie Preparedness Month, however, is not actually about planning a defense against viral reincarnate flesh eaters. Instead, Brownback's administration wants to capitalize on pop culture's zombie obsession to raise awareness about disaster planning and response.

State officials say the preparations needed for a fictional zombie attack are a good exercise for the natural disasters that could actually hit Kansas in the near future. The agency is calling on Kansans to devise a survival plan that they could implement in the unlikely event that a horde of zombies descends upon the Sunflower State. Five of the best entries will be highlighted during "Zombie Preparedness Day" on Oct. 25, an event that will take place in Topeka.

"If you're equipped to handle the zombie apocalypse, then you're prepared for tornadoes, severe storms, fire, and any other natural disaster Kansas usually faces," said Devan Tucking, a Human Services Officer with the Kansas Division of Emergency Management.

And Kansas isn't the only place preparing for the arrival of the living dead. In Virginia, Northern Virginia Community College is planning an event Thursday where zombie look-alikes will swarm the campus sharing tips with students about how to plan for disaster.

This post originally appeared on National Journal, an Atlantic partner site.

More from National Journal:

ALEC: Global Warming Could Be Good for You

Why Bad Polls Are Good for Business

Eric Holder Will Resign as Attorney General

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Maria Romano stands behind one of her three children, Jennifer, 10, as she gets something to eat in their Harlem apartment in New York Thursday, June 3, 2005
    Equity

    Why HUD Wants to Restrict Assistance for Immigrants

    A proposal by Ben Carson’s agency would eject immigrant families from public housing to make way for the "most vulnerable." Housing advocates aren't buying it.

  2. Solar panels on a New York City rooftop.
    Environment

    New York City Passes Sweeping Climate Legislation

    The Climate Mobilization Act lays the groundwork for New York City’s own Green New Deal.

  3. a rendering of the moon village with a view of Earth
    Design

    Designing the First Full-Time Human Habitat on the Moon

    SOM, in partnership with the ESA and MIT, wants to accommodate research and maybe even tourism on the moon.

  4. a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

    A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

  5. Transportation

    Electric Scooters Aren’t a Transportation Revolution Yet

    New data show a staggering rise in shared dockless e-scooter use nationwide. But commuting habits have seen little change since the dawn of micromobility.