Already hit hard by snow, Boston and the rest of New England might have to brace for more. AP / Steven Senne

An impressive-looking system might dump even more snow Thursday into Friday.

People of New England—y'all ready for spring? Then perhaps don't read this weather discussion predicting that on the heels of today's powerful nor'easter could come yet another significant snowstorm.

The Clipper system is still somewhere out West, but the National Weather Service in Boston says it already looks "fairly impressive." It's expected to arrive in the Northeast Thursday night into Friday, and while it won't be as potent as the current storm, it could dump even more snow on the powder-crusted land. (This forecast is specific to the region around Boston; in New York, any possible snow from this storm is expected to be lighter.)

How bad it will be depends on whether it takes a northern or southern path; the former would spare New England the worst of its frigid acrimony. As the NWS explained early Tuesday morning:

THE PRIMARY TRACK OF A CLIPPER LOW SHOULD BE TO THE NORTH OF SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND. THIS SHOULD RESULT IN MORE SCATTERED SNOWFALL. [BUT] PLOWABLE AMOUNTS ARE POSSIBLE... EVEN WITH THE MORE NORTHERN TRACK.

Yay! And if that doesn't get you pumped about the weather, New England, know also there's also a chance of snow Sunday into Monday, and that temperatures will be "MUCH COLDER EARLY NEXT WEEK," as per the NWS' assessment.

Higher probabilities of below-average temperatures beginning February 1 are shown in blue. (NWS/CPC)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  2. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  3. a photo of a Dodge Challenger
    Transportation

    The ‘Airbnb of Cars’ Gets Heat From the Rental Car Industry

    Peer-to-peer sharing services that let owners rent out their vehicles are a focus of concern from traditional car rental companies, who see disruption ahead.

  4. Equity

    A Visual History of the U.S. Census

    Vulnerable communities are bracing for an undercount in 2020. It’s a familiar story that traces back to the Articles of Confederation.

  5. Environment

    Housing Discrimination Made Summers Even Hotter

    The practice of redlining in the 1930s helps explain why poorer U.S. neighborhoods experience more extreme heat.

×