Already hit hard by snow, Boston and the rest of New England might have to brace for more. AP / Steven Senne

An impressive-looking system might dump even more snow Thursday into Friday.

People of New England—y'all ready for spring? Then perhaps don't read this weather discussion predicting that on the heels of today's powerful nor'easter could come yet another significant snowstorm.

The Clipper system is still somewhere out West, but the National Weather Service in Boston says it already looks "fairly impressive." It's expected to arrive in the Northeast Thursday night into Friday, and while it won't be as potent as the current storm, it could dump even more snow on the powder-crusted land. (This forecast is specific to the region around Boston; in New York, any possible snow from this storm is expected to be lighter.)

How bad it will be depends on whether it takes a northern or southern path; the former would spare New England the worst of its frigid acrimony. As the NWS explained early Tuesday morning:

THE PRIMARY TRACK OF A CLIPPER LOW SHOULD BE TO THE NORTH OF SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND. THIS SHOULD RESULT IN MORE SCATTERED SNOWFALL. [BUT] PLOWABLE AMOUNTS ARE POSSIBLE... EVEN WITH THE MORE NORTHERN TRACK.

Yay! And if that doesn't get you pumped about the weather, New England, know also there's also a chance of snow Sunday into Monday, and that temperatures will be "MUCH COLDER EARLY NEXT WEEK," as per the NWS' assessment.

Higher probabilities of below-average temperatures beginning February 1 are shown in blue. (NWS/CPC)

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