Local reporters are speculating the beast may be sick or hurt.

A news chopper flying over Tacoma, Washington, this morning spotted what looks like a gray whale, passing through a narrow and boat-cluttered urban channel called the Thea Foss Waterway.

KIRO 7 reporter Michelle Millman wondered what the gentle leviathan was doing there, positing a possible link to poor health:

Environmental nonprofit Citizens for a Healthy Bay has mentioned also seeing the whale. As of now, no more sightings have emerged on news sites or social media (though KIRO 7 might update later on).

This map shows how skinny the Foss Waterway is:

(Google Maps)

And here's a clear shot of the channel, which is dense with boats:

(Google Maps)

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