Everything's hidden. AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

The city is under a thick film of sand.

Cairo is experiencing a serious sandstorm—two children have reportedly died, ports are closed, and flights were still changing their routes after the airport stopped allowing arrivals for a short time yesterday.

This is how the city looked yesterday, as the sandstorm was developing:

The start of the sandstorm. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)

By today the city was under a thick film of sand.

Students run home to get out of the storm. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)
It's everywhere. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
Still, some people left their homes. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
The sandstorm doesn't recognize city limits. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)

Some on Twitter have noted that this storm did not prevent Russian President Vladimir Putin’s visit to Egypt—he arrived on Jan. 9.

This piece originally appeared on Quartz, an Atlantic partner site.

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