Everything's hidden. AP Photo/Hassan Ammar

The city is under a thick film of sand.

Cairo is experiencing a serious sandstorm—two children have reportedly died, ports are closed, and flights were still changing their routes after the airport stopped allowing arrivals for a short time yesterday.

This is how the city looked yesterday, as the sandstorm was developing:

The start of the sandstorm. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)

By today the city was under a thick film of sand.

Students run home to get out of the storm. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)
It's everywhere. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
Still, some people left their homes. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
The sandstorm doesn't recognize city limits. (AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy)

Some on Twitter have noted that this storm did not prevent Russian President Vladimir Putin’s visit to Egypt—he arrived on Jan. 9.

This piece originally appeared on Quartz, an Atlantic partner site.

More from Quartz:

A Decade Ago, Brian Williams Would've Gotten Away With It

Napster Still Exists, And It Has Millions of Streaming Subscribers

The Mycoin Scandal in Hong Kong Had Nothing to Do With Actual Bitcoins

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    How Poor Americans Get Exploited by Their Landlords

    American landlords derive more profit from renters in low-income neighborhoods, researchers Matthew Desmond and Nathan Wilmers find.

  2. A photo of the interior of a WeWork co-working office.
    Design

    WeWork Wants to Build the ‘Future of Cities.’ What Does That Mean?

    The co-working startup is hatching plans to deploy data to reimagine urban problems. In the past, it has profiled neighborhoods based on class indicators.

  3. An illustration of a private train.
    Transportation

    Let’s Buy a Train

    If you dream of roaming the U.S. in a your own personal train car, you still can. But Amtrak cuts have railcar owners wondering if their days are numbered.

  4. Design

    Cities Deserve Better Than These Thomas Heatherwick Gimmicks

    The “Vessel” at New York’s Hudson Yards—like so many of his designs—look as if the dystopian world of 1984 has been given a precious makeover.

  5. A photo of San Antonio's Latino High Line
    Equity

    A 'Latino High Line' Promises Change for San Antonio

    The San Pedro Creek Culture Park stands to be a transformative project for nearby neighborhoods. To fight displacement, the city is creating a risk mitigation fund.