It's been a rough winter in Boston. But that doesn't mean people aren't having fun. AP Photo/Elise Amendola

Bostonians, including one Yeti, have gotten inventive with their snow this year.

The winter of 2015 will go down as one of the most unforgiving in recent memory. Spring, believe it or not, is less than 20 days away. But this week's weather is a reminder for some northeast cities that escaping winter is going to take time; more snow dumped across the East Coast on Thursday, from North Carolina all the way up to—you guessed it—Boston. The neo-North Pole.

(NOAA)

Writing in CityLab in February, Sascha Haselmayer explained how this year's record-setting snowfall led Boston to implore residents to be exceptionally proactive. After spending $30 million on snow response in January alone, the city welcomed the input from local entrepreneurs. "Once you open up a problem to citizens, innovators and entrepreneurs, almost anything is possible," Haselmayer wrote, suggesting the 2015 weather, in turn, encouraged "citizen engagement on a new level."

But Boston's creative spirit with snow hasn't been limited to task-forcing its removal. Everyday Bostonians are working with snow as new medium. Here are some of the most innovative snow experiments (so far) of 2015:

DIY snow bars

Booze: It warms the gut and the soul. Amateur bartenders of Boston have waited out the city's relentless snow storms by making backyard bars out of the stuff. The Jamaica Plain News has a great spread of one of the bars here. Building these should become a tradition as timeless as sticking a carrot onto a snowman.

Cycling tunnel

This year's snowfall has not been kind to cyclists. Still, one Bostonian was determined to bicycle to his nearest T station.* When he found a mound of snow blocking his path, according to StreetsBlog USA, he decided to tunnel through it. Take a trip through the snow tunnel in the video below. *UPDATE 12/31: CityLab reader Ari Goldberger writes in to clarify that his snow tunnel was *not* in fact designed in order to reach the T. “The real reason for the snow tunnel was to be able to continue using my route of choice to get between home and work, entirely by bicycle,” says Goldberger. Duly noted!

ShipSnowYo.com

One Massachusetts resident has been turning the excess of snow on his property into profit. As reported by ABC news, a resident of suburban Boston is selling boxes of snow on ShipSnowYo.com. According to the website, you can purchase "a blizzard in a box"—a whopping 22 pounds of Masshole snow—for $199. If that's too steep, settle for the six-pound version at only $89. Oh, capitalism.

The Boston Yeti

You've got to respect someone who can combine form and function in their winter outwear. Like this person roaming the city dressed as a Yeti.

Technically, the Boston Yeti lives just north of the city, in Somerville, according to his or her twitter account. But who's going to argue with a Yeti?

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