Billowing smoke and furious animals combine in these "terror haze" illustrations.

China's air quality can get so bad it's like walking through a smokey forest fire. One wonders if officials would be be more aggressive with polluters if their offices were wallpapered with something like this:

Liu Yang/Kai Huo

Gaahh! What is that awful thing? Chinese designers Liu Yang and Kai Huo call it a haze "animal." I would add that it looks like a gorilla, a lightning storm, and the smoke monster from Lost entered a telepod and emerged as something that could make children weep for days.

The yelling electro-ape is just one horrifying monster in Yang and Huo's portfolio of anti-smog PSAs. The designers used computer illustration to summon a snapping dragon, a furious bear, and other menacing beasties, with the hope they'd get people talking about the pollution epidemic. They posted them in public areas around Shenyang, and distributed them on microblogs and Facebook. This week, their efforts were rewarded when the project snagged a winning title at the A' Design awards.

Here's how they describe the purpose of the animalistic campaign:

Every autumn and winter, haze always hit, especially most city Chinese north, haze is very serious, people live under the shadow of terror haze. Human, animal, plant, buildings and so on are all great harm. These illustrations by investigating the haze, haze of urban hazard for animal, painted a variety of animals and the earth smoke modeling. This design according to the harm of human as the creative source of haze, haze into earth, into a variety of animal, calling attention to avoid haze haze, haze, away from harm.

Yes—stay away from the haze. Message absolutely received, guys:

Liu Yang/Kai Huo

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. An illustration of a private train.
    Transportation

    Let’s Buy a Train

    If you dream of roaming the U.S. in a your own personal train car, you still can. But Amtrak cuts have railcar owners wondering if their days are numbered.

  2. A photo of the interior of a WeWork co-working office.
    Design

    WeWork Wants to Build the ‘Future of Cities.’ What Does That Mean?

    The co-working startup is hatching plans to deploy data to reimagine urban problems. In the past, it has profiled neighborhoods based on class indicators.

  3. A photo of San Antonio's Latino High Line
    Equity

    A 'Latino High Line' Promises Change for San Antonio

    The San Pedro Creek Culture Park stands to be a transformative project for nearby neighborhoods. To fight displacement, the city is creating a risk mitigation fund.

  4. Equity

    How Poor Americans Get Exploited by Their Landlords

    American landlords derive more profit from renters in low-income neighborhoods, researchers Matthew Desmond and Nathan Wilmers find.

  5. A forking path in the forest at Van Cortlandt Park in New York City.
    Environment

    America’s Management of Urban Forests Has Room for Improvement

    A new survey finds that urban forests could benefit from better data on climate change and pests and a focus on social equity.