Some Taiwanese look on the bright side of a deadly storm by posing with slumping receptacles.

超可愛的有沒有! 比起彩繪郵筒還是天然ㄟ尚好

A photo posted by Jing-Ya (@lingocandy) on

When it hit Taiwan, Typhoon Soudelor was powerful enough to hurl a car down the road, ragdoll a scooter, and crush mailboxes into a drunken-looking slump.

Though locals are no doubt still bemoaning the storm’s destruction—the latest toll is about two-dozen dead in Taiwan and China—some have embraced the damaged boxes, flocking to pose for goofy pictures. They’ve become such a sensation there are now toys of them circulating. Reports the Taipei Times:

Two mailboxes in Taipei have become tourist attractions after a shop sign fell on them during Typhoon Soudelor, with visitors saying they now resemble two people standing next to each other and leaning.

The mailboxes—one red and the other green—are on Longjiang Road (龍江路) in Taipei….

Chunghwa Post Co chairman Philip Ong (翁文祺) yesterday said that the two mailboxes would remain at their current location, adding that the post office plans to turn the site into a tourist attraction.

He added that a sign would be set up to the side of the mailboxes informing visitors how they had been damaged by Typhoon Soudelor.

Even as monuments, the boxes will still accept letters.

颱風過後 #typhoon#newattraction#mailboxes#taipei#Lol#郵

A photo posted by ✨Stacie📈 (@staciieline) on

#這是ㄧ種我無法理解的概念 #自得其樂 #颱風 #湊熱鬧 #郵筒

A photo posted by Angel Huang (@angel20739) on

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