"We have a bunch of kids on this team where the community told them they'd probably never amount to anything."

When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in August of 2005, the students of Warren Easton High School scattered across the country. The school board was set to shutter Warren Easton—the oldest public high school in Louisiana—because of damage from the storm. In 2006, however, the school reopened and ever since then has been rebuilding its fledgling football team from scratch. This short documentary follows the Warren Easton football team all the way to the Louisiana state championship game last year, the apex of their comeback. "We have a bunch of kids on this team where the community told them they'd probably never amount to anything," says head coach Tony Hull. "They care about this game a whole lot, because they know this game can take them to places they've never been before."

The film is the second episode in the series "Glory Days: High School Sports in America," which was co-created by Victory Journal and Prospect Productions. It was originally developed for Complex Media and is presented by Powerade. Colin Barnicle was the director, Nicholas Strini was the director of photography, and original still photographs were taken by Christaan Felber. You can follow Victory Journal on Facebook,Twitter, and Instagram.

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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