A man walks along the city's historic boardwalk as Hurricane Patricia approaches the Pacific beach resort of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, on October 23. 2015. REUTERS/Henry Romero

Hurricane Patricia is forecasted to make landfall in Mexico today.

This story was originally published by Mother Jones and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

The strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Western Hemisphere is barreling toward Mexico's Pacific coast, where it is expected to make landfall later Friday. According to the National Hurricane Center (NHC), Hurricane Patricia now has maximum sustained wind speeds near 200 miles per hour and even higher wind gusts. That makes it a Category 5 storm—the highest rating on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale.

Hurricane warnings are currently in effect for much of the Mexican states of Nayarit, Colima, and Jalisco, including the resort city of Puerto Vallarta, whose metropolitan area is home to 380,000 people. Tens of thousands of people are being evacuated, according to the Vallarta Daily.

Category 5 hurricanes are terrifying. According to the NHC, during a typical storm of this strength, "a high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months." The NHC is predicting that Patricia will make a "catastrophic landfall," dumping up to 20 inches of rain in some areas, which will likely result in "life-threatening" flash floods and mud slides. There will also be an "extremely dangerous" storm surge that will cause substantial coastal flooding "accompanied by large and destructive waves."

The remnants of the storm could even help produce heavy rainfall along the Texas coast in a few days.

Hurricane Patricia's incredible power may be part of a disturbing pattern. As Chris Mooney reported for Climate Desk a couple years ago, a number of the world's major hurricane basins have set (or have arguably set) new hurricane intensity records since the year 2000.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Perspective

    In a Pandemic, We're All 'Transit Dependent'

    Now more than ever, public transportation is not just about ridership. Buses, trains, and subways make urban civilization possible.

  2. Coronavirus

    The Post-Pandemic Urban Future Is Already Here

    The coronavirus crisis stands to dramatically reshape cities around the world. But the biggest revolutions in urban space may have begun before the pandemic.

  3. A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a boarded up building in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Governors from coast to coast Friday told Americans not to leave home except for dire circumstances and ordered nonessential business to shut their doors.
    Equity

    The Geography of Coronavirus

    What do we know so far about the types of places that are more susceptible to the spread of Covid-19? In the U.S., density is just the beginning of the story.

  4. Traffic-free Times Square in New York City
    Maps

    Mapping How Cities Are Reclaiming Street Space

    To help get essential workers around, cities are revising traffic patterns, suspending public transit fares, and making more room for bikes and pedestrians.

  5. Equity

    What Bigotry Looks Like During Social Distancing

    As reports of harassment and assault against Asian Americans increase, community advocates are finding new ways to tackle the spread of xenophobia.

×