Street artist HULA visited a disintegrating glacier to craft this haunting piece.

The way sea levels are projected to rise, coastal citizens may all be trudging around brow-high in water by the end of the century. That flooded future is well channeled in this new piece from Sean Yoro, who adorned an iceberg with the image of a half-submerged woman’s face.

Yoro, a New York-based artist who goes by HULA, traveled to an unspecified glacier in Iceland* to craft several statements on climate change. The one above, titled “A’o ‘Ana (The Warning),” was executed with oil paint on an acrylic sheet. (Here’s hoping he picked up the plastic afterward.) Yoro writes on Instagram:

Series of murals painted on a few of the thousands of icebergs freshly broken off from a nearby glacier. In the short time I was there, I witnessed the extreme melting rate first hand as the sound of ice cracking was a constant background noise while painting. Within a few weeks these murals will be forever gone, but for those who find them, I hope they ignite a sense of urgency, as they represent the millions of people in need of our help who are already being affected from the rising sea levels of Climate Change.

You can find more photos from the artist’s northern trek on his website.

HULA

* Correction: The glacier is not in North America as originally stated but Iceland, though the artist’s team won’t say where due to legal concerns.

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