That’s not a storm, just people blowing up stuff out of joy.

Kansas City Royals players celebrate after their 7-2 victory against the New York Mets on Sunday. (Peter Morgan/AP)

How do you know your hometown scored a major sports victory? How about when the signature of people blowing stuff up in celebration is so large it appears on radar?

Weather radar has been known to pick up many interesting things, from bats to butterflies to a giant ball of bugs. On Sunday, the National Weather Service office in Kansas City/Pleasant Hill, Missouri, detected something else: fireworks exploding all over the place as folks cheered the Royals’ 7-2 World Series win over the New York Mets.

Our radar can detect a wide variety of particulates and objects in the atmosphere,” writes the agency on Facebook. “Aside from the standard hydrometeors (rain, snow, sleet, hail, drizzle, etc...) it can detect and display migrating birds, bats taking off in the evening, bugs, military chaff, at times wind farms and traffic on local highways, and of course smoke from fires and fireworks.”

Locals confirm things were literally popping around Kansas City. “WOW! There were more fireworks going off simultaneously, than on JULY 4th!” says one woman. Adds a man: “I know I woke up a few neighbors with some uhhhhhh.......legal fireworks......wink,wink!”

No word yet on whether any New York radar has picked up on Mets fans’ torrential downpour of tears.

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