That’s not a storm, just people blowing up stuff out of joy.

Kansas City Royals players celebrate after their 7-2 victory against the New York Mets on Sunday. (Peter Morgan/AP)

How do you know your hometown scored a major sports victory? How about when the signature of people blowing stuff up in celebration is so large it appears on radar?

Weather radar has been known to pick up many interesting things, from bats to butterflies to a giant ball of bugs. On Sunday, the National Weather Service office in Kansas City/Pleasant Hill, Missouri, detected something else: fireworks exploding all over the place as folks cheered the Royals’ 7-2 World Series win over the New York Mets.

Our radar can detect a wide variety of particulates and objects in the atmosphere,” writes the agency on Facebook. “Aside from the standard hydrometeors (rain, snow, sleet, hail, drizzle, etc...) it can detect and display migrating birds, bats taking off in the evening, bugs, military chaff, at times wind farms and traffic on local highways, and of course smoke from fires and fireworks.”

Locals confirm things were literally popping around Kansas City. “WOW! There were more fireworks going off simultaneously, than on JULY 4th!” says one woman. Adds a man: “I know I woke up a few neighbors with some uhhhhhh.......legal fireworks......wink,wink!”

No word yet on whether any New York radar has picked up on Mets fans’ torrential downpour of tears.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  2. A map of Minneapolis from the late 19th century.
    Maps

    When Minneapolis Segregated

    In the early 1900s, racial housing covenants in the Minnesota city blocked home sales to minorities, establishing patterns of inequality that persist today.

  3. A Seoul Metro employee, second left, monitors passengers, to ensure face masks are worn, on a platform inside a subway station in Seoul, South Korea.
    Transportation

    How to Safely Travel on Mass Transit During Coronavirus

    To stay protected from Covid-19 on buses, trains and planes, experts say to focus more on distance from fellow passengers than air ventilation or surfaces.

  4. A map of population density in Tokyo, circa 1926.
    Maps

    How to Detect the Distortions of Maps

    All maps have biases. A new online exhibit explores the history of map distortions, from intentional propaganda to basic data literacy.

  5. Maps

    Your Maps of Life Under Lockdown

    Stressful commutes, unexpected routines, and emergent wildlife appear in your homemade maps of life during the coronavirus pandemic.

×