Masked for survival. AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal

Doctors have advised those with pulmonary and heart diseases to leave the city.

New Delhi is gasping for breath.

The Indian capital, home to some 16 million people, has been engulfed in smog for the past month. Smoke from firecrackers during Diwali and the burning of paddy straw in adjoining states have compounded the pollution problem in New Delhi, which, according to WHO, is already the most polluted city in the world.

Doctors have advised those with pulmonary and heart diseases to leave the city, while the state government is considering giving holidays to schoolchildren.

But for many, who still have to work daily to make ends meet, there will be no respite from the hazardous smog. As of 10 a.m. on December 4, the air quality index in New Delhi was at a “very unhealthy” 286, according to the U.S. Embassy’s monitoring station.

“There has been a seven-time increase in pollution levels since October 1,” Anurita Roychowdhury, executive director at New Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment, told the Press Trust of India. “The winter pollution is going to be very serious. Advisories need to be issued asking people to minimise their levels of outdoor activity.”

The government, meanwhile, has plans to force all commercial trucks that are more than 15 years old to stay off the road from April 2016 to check vehicle emissions.

Here is a glimpse of how people in Delhi are trying to breathe through these difficult times.

Indian student Aman Phogot, 19, who wears a mask to protect himself from pollution, stops to pose for a photograph as he walks towards a metro station in New Delhi, on Nov. 25. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)
Virdhi, 56, wears a scarf on his face to protect from pollution, as he sits near a two-wheeler workshop in New Delhi, on Nov. 23. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)
An Indian woman who has her face covered to protect from pollution and dust poses at a footbridge in New Delhi, on Nov. 27. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)
A man wears a mask to protect from pollution as he sits at the Lodhi garden in New Delhi, on Dec. 1. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)
An Indian woman riding a two-wheeler has her face covered to protect from pollution as she waits at a traffic signal in New Delhi, on Nov. 23. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)
An Indian woman covers her face from pollution as she waits at a bus station in New Delhi, on Nov. 27. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)
Birds fly in the morning as buildings are covered with smog in New Delhi, on Nov. 25. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)
Streaks of light show traffic moving in New Delhi, on Dec. 1. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)
Commuters walk as vehicles move at a traffic signal in New Delhi, on Nov. 24. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)
Smoke billows out of a chimney of a small scale factory in New Delhi, on Dec. 1. (AP Photo /Tsering Topgyal)

This post originally appeared on Quartz, an Atlantic partner site.

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