AP/J. Scott Applewhite

An urban-forestry nonprofit has mapped the city’s gorgeous, but not-so-touristy, flowering trees.

The famed Japanese cherry trees of Washington, D.C., are now entering their peak blooming period. That means locals are in for an incredible sight: raucous crowds of camera-wielding tourists swarming the Tidal Basin, snapping away as if Obama himself was under the boughs doing bare-chested jumping jacks.

For folks who want to absorb the sublime beauty of fresh petals with less commotion, the nonprofit Casey Trees has cobbled together a wonderfully comprehensive guide to the city’s other cherry blossoms and less-celebrated blooming forestry. “We created this map in part because this time of year cherry trees get a lot of love in D.C.” says Jason Galliger, the organization’s digital strategist. “But our urban forest is so much more than just those trees around the Tidal Basin. We wanted our audience to be able to find and explore all kinds of different flowering trees throughout the city.”

The map is based on Casey’s data as well as info from the National Park Service, the D.C. government, and elsewhere, and includes mainly trees on federal or public land. It was made by Josh Pullin, a 25-year-old junior-level GIS analyst at the organization. Warning to fruit thieves: While there may be a large number of apple trees in D.C., Pullin notes “a good many of those are crabapples, which while beautiful when they flower would make terrible pies!”

The map is fairly self-explanatory; click the upper-right tab for a drop-down menu of tree species. Look at all these cherry trees you could gawk at outside of the Tidal Basin:

And here’s a view of the city’s flowering diversity, featuring apple trees (green), cherry trees (pink), crapemyrtles (salmon), dogwoods (red), goldenrain trees (yellow-green), lilacs (deep purple), and Japanese pagoda trees (blue), which are known for their fragrant, ivory blossoms:

Casey Trees

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of anti-gentrification graffiti in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    The Hidden Winners in Neighborhood Gentrification

    A new study claims the effects of neighborhood change on original lower-income residents are largely positive, despite fears of spiking rents and displacement.

  2. Life

    The Future of the City Is Childless

    America’s urban rebirth is missing something key—actual births.

  3. A crowded street outside in Boston
    Life

    Surveillance Cameras Debunk the Bystander Effect

    A new study uses camera footage to track the frequency of bystander intervention in heated incidents in Amsterdam; Cape Town; and Lancaster, England.                            

  4. A Bank of America building.
    Equity

    Could Public Banks Help California Fund Affordable Housing?

    A coalition of bank activists in ten California cities is pushing for public banks. A bill to support them is working its way through the state legislature.

  5. a photo of graffiti in Bristol, UK
    Life

    What Happens to ‘Smart Cities’ When the Internet Dies?

    In the fictional dystopia of Tim Maughan’s novel Infinite Detail, our dependence on urban technology has been suddenly severed.

×