A tropical cyclone swirls in the Pacific Ocean this February. NASA

The Mid-Atlantic and Southeast U.S. could be in for a rainy holiday.

Who doesn’t love spending Memorial Day weekend hunched indoors with rain lashing at the windows? That could be the dismal reality for folks in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast U.S., as a disturbance in the Atlantic Ocean is threatening to rev up into a full-fledged tropical cyclone.

NOAA/NHC

The low-pressure zone, shown here on Wednesday night, has a 40-to-60-percent chance of becoming a cyclone in the coming days, according to NOAA’s National Hurricane Center. “Environmental conditions are expected to gradually become more conducive for development, and a tropical or subtropical cyclone could form on Friday or Saturday,” the center writes. “The low is forecast to move slowly west-northwestward or northwestward and approach the southeastern United States over the weekend.”

If it develops into a tropical storm it would be named Bonnie, and under normal circumstances would be the first Atlantic cyclone of the year. However, Alex snatched that title, turning into a hurricane five months ago—the first to form in January since 1938. The current tempest is more on schedule, as the Atlantic hurricane season, which is predicted to be active this year, starts June 1.

NOAA/NHC

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