Mark Olson/FCSO

The roving reptile might’ve been driven into the open by Tropical Storm Colin.

Proving that a stolid beast of the swamp is better than many people at traffic safety, a 5-foot-long alligator was seen recently in northeast Florida traversing a road within the boundaries of a crosswalk.

Officers with the Flagler County Sheriff’s Office spotted the reptile on Monday morning milling about some bushes. “It was sitting by the crosswalk and suddenly scampered across the entire roadway in the crosswalk,” the department writes on Facebook. A Flagler corporal adds: “He just walked in the crosswalk like it was normal.”

A trapper was called but the alligator disappeared into the woods, presumably to scoot around one of Florida’s many roundabouts in a safe, orderly fashion. Given that reptiles tend to roam around in times of heavy rain and flooding, this might not be the last gator sighting as Tropical Storm Colin makes its way over the state.

H/t NBC 6

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