Here’s something you don’t often see in New York.

There were roughly 90,000 lightning strikes across the New York/Pennsylvania region during Monday’s storms, and one of them appears to have delivered a singeing body-blow to the Empire State Building.

The blast was caught on video by Henrik Moltke, a journalist who’s written for The Intercept. “I’m gonna stand here all day, thunder,” Moltke says, moments before the bolt lands. Oddly, it didn’t hit the tallest point of the building; one Redditor surmises it connected with an observation deck.

For folks wishing the lightning zapped a certain other notable Manhattan skyscraper—hey, there’s always next time. Meanwhile, please enjoy this footage of the Trump Tower in Chicago getting lit up in 2014:

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