Ewa Tuteja’s ambitious photography project is a “homage to the beauty of the sky.”

Many of us have cast our eyes upward and thought, Gee, that’s a nice sky.

Few are like Ewa Tuteja, though, who does this, takes a photo, then repeats the process every afternoon for the rest of the year. Tuteja, a data artist from Berlin, is three-quarters of the way through an ambitious project of documenting her city’s ever-changing heavenscape in 2016. She posts each daily photo at the “Sky Over Berlin,” revealing September to be a marvelous time for deep-blue skies, June a parade of tumultuous, elephant-colored clouds, and July 16 a moment where a formation appeared that resembled a “duck with beak and a hippopotamus,” to judge from Google Translate. (I see a diver jumping into waves.)

Tuteja plans to keep this going for 366 days—regarding why, she writes:

It’s an homage to the beauty of the sky.

Every day an individually chosen moment in time and space is captured—mostly around midday. So the project is artistic and abstract in nature rather then an objective collection and display of data. Yet the aim is to be as little arbitrary as possible.

And on another level, it is also about mindful moments every day. To stop, look into the sky and smile.

Have a look at her Instagram to see what 2016 has delivered so far, including this amazing scene from September 15:

15th of September '16 259/366 #skyoverberlin #berlin #todaysky #dataviz #visualization #sky

A photo posted by Sky Over Berlin (@skyoverberlin16) on

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